Categories
curriculum research

Proposal abstract: Case-based learning in undergraduate physiotherapy education

Abstract for a project I submitted earlier this week for ethics clearance. During 2012 – 2014 we converted one of our modules that runs in the 2nd, 3rd and 4th year levels from a lecture-based format to a case-based learning format. We are now hoping to have a closer look at whether or not the CBL approach led to any changes in teaching and learning behaviours in staff and students.

Case-based learning (CBL) is a teaching method that makes use of clinical narratives to create an authentic learning activity in which students navigate their way through complex patient scenarios. The use of CBL in a health professions undergraduate curriculum attempts to convey a multidimensional representation of the context, participants and reality of a clinical situation, allowing students to explore these concepts in the classroom. While the implementation of CBL has a sound theoretical basis, as well as a strong evidence base for use in health professions education, there are challenges in its effective use that are not easily resolved. However, if it can be shown that the approach leads to changes in teaching and learning practice, which enhance student learning, providing additional resources to resolve the challenges can be more strongly justified. This project therefore aims to determine staff members’ and students’ perceptions of CBL as a teaching method, and to find out how it influenced their teaching and learning behaviours.

This study will make use of a mixed method research design in which the experiences and perceptions of student and staff members are used to determine whether or not there was a change in their teaching and learning practice. Qualitative and quantitative data will be gathered using a survey of all students in the population, focus group discussions of students and in-depth interviews of all staff in the department. The survey will determine if the design of the CBL approach led to a change in what the students did. The focus group discussions will gather data on the nature of the changes and the underlying rationale for those changes. The interviews with lecturers will be conducted in order to delve more deeply into whether or not lecturers’ teaching behaviours changed, and again, to explore the underlying rationale of those changes.

The survey will make use of a self-developed questionnaire that will gather quantitative data using Likert scales and other closed-ended questions. The survey will be sent to all 3rd and 4th year students in the 2015 academic year. The same students will be invited to participate in the focus groups, and the researchers will make use of purposive sampling to allocate volunteers into two focus groups in each year level. All lecturers in the department (n=10) will be invited to participate in the in-depth interviews, including those who were not directly involved in the implementation of CBL. In addition, we will also invite ex-staff members who were involved in the process, as well as postgraduate students who assisted with student facilitation.

Qualitative data will be gathered during the focus groups and interviews. This data will be interpreted via the theoretical frameworks used in the design of the CBL cases. The focus group discussions and interviews will be conducted in English and recorded using a digital audio recorder. The audio files will be sent for verbatim transcription and the anonymised, transcribed documents will then be sent to participants for verification. The transcripts will be analysed thematically, coding the data into categories of emerging themes. Trustworthiness of the analysis will be determined through member checking and peer debriefing and participants will be given the opportunity to comment on whether or not the data was interpreted according to what they meant. The transcribed verbatim draft will be given to colleagues who were not involved in the study for comment.

Categories
physiotherapy research social media technology

Design principles for clinical reasoning

graphic_design smallerClinical reasoning is hard to do, and even harder to facilitate in novice practitioners who lack the experience and patterns of thinking that enable them to establish conceptual relationships that are often non-trivial. Experienced clinicians have developed, over many years and many patients, a set of thinking patterns that influence the clinical decisions they make, and which they are often unaware of. The development of tacit knowledge and its application in the clinical context is largely done unconsciously, which is why experienced clinicians often feel like they “just know” what to do.

Developing clinical reasoning is included as part of clinical education, yet it is usually implicit. Students are expected to “do” clinical reasoning, yet we find it difficult to explain just what we mean by that. How do you model a way of thinking?

One of the starting points is to ask what we mean when we talk about clinical education. Traditionally, clinical education describes the teaching and learning experiences that happen in a clinical context, maybe a hospital, outpatient or clinic setting. However, if we redefine “clinical education” to mean activities that stimulate the patterns of thinking needed to think and behave in the real world, then “clinical education” is something that can happen anywhere, at any time.

My PhD was about exploring the possibilities for change that are made available through the integration of technology into clinical education. The main outcome of the project was the development of a set of draft design principles that emerged through a series of research projects that included students, clinicians and clinical educators. These principles can be used to design online and physical learning spaces that create opportunities for students to develop critical thinking as part of clinical reasoning. Each top-level principle is associated with a number of “facets” that further describe the application of the principles.

Here are the draft design principles (note that the supporting evidence and additional discussion are not included here):

1. Facilitate interaction through enhanced communication

  • Interaction can be between people and content
  • Communication is iterative and aims to improve understanding through structured dialogue that is conducted over time
  • Digital content is not inert, and can transform interactions by responding and changing over time
  • Content is a framework around which a process of interaction can take place – it is a means to an end, not an end in itself
  • When content is distributed over networks, the “learning environment” becomes all possible spaces where learning can happen
  • Interaction is possible in a range of contexts, and not exclusively during scheduled times

2. Require articulation

  • Articulation gives form and substance to abstract ideas, thereby exposing understanding
  • Articulation is about committing to a statement based on personal experience, that is supported by evidence
  • Articulation is public, making students accountable for what they believe
  • Articulation allows students’ thinking to be challenged or reinforced
  • Incomplete understanding is not a point of failure, but a normal part of moving towards understanding

3. Build relationships

  • Knowledge can be developed through the interaction between people, content and objects, through networks
  • Relationships can be built around collaborative activity where the responsibility for learning is shared
  • Facilitators are part of the process, and students are partners in teaching and learning
  • Facilitators are not gatekeepers – they are locksmiths
  • Create a safe space where “not knowing” is as important as “knowing”
  • Teaching and learning is a dynamic, symbiotic relationship between people
  • Building relationships takes into account both personal and professional development
  • Building relationships means balancing out power so that students also have a say in when and how learning happens

4. Embrace complexity

  • Develop learning spaces that are more, not less, complex
  • Change variables within the learning space, to replicate the dynamic context of the real world
  • Create problems that have poorly defined boundaries and which defy simple solutions

5. Encourage creativity

  • Students must identify gaps in their own understanding, and engage in a process of knowledge creation to fill those gaps
  • These products of learning are created through an iterative activity that includes interaction through discussion and feedback
  • Learning materials created should be shared with others throughout the process, to enable interaction around both process and product
  • Processes of content development should be structured according to the ability of the students

6. Stimulate reflection

  • Learning activities should have reflection built in
  • Completing the reflection should have a real consequence for the student
  • Reflection should be modelled for students
  • Reflections should be shared with others
  • Feedback on reflections should be provided as soon after the experience as possible
  • Students need to determine the value of reflection for themselves, it cannot be told to them

7. Acknowledge emotion

  • Create a safe, non­judgemental space for students to share their personal experiences and thoughts, as well as their emotional responses to those experiences
  • Facilitators should validate students’ emotional responses
  • These shared experiences can inform valuable teaching moments
  • Facilitators are encouraged to share personal values and their own emotional responses to clinical encounters, normalising and scaffolding the process
  • Sensitive topics should be covered in face­to­face sessions
  • Facilitators’ emotional responses to teaching and learning should be acknowledged, as well their emotional responses to the clinical context

8. Flexibility

  • The learning environment should be flexible enough to adapt to the changing needs of students, but structured enough to scaffold their progress
  • The components of the curriculum (i.e. the teaching strategies, assessment tasks and content) should be flexible and should change when necessary
  • Facilitators should be flexible, changing schedules and approaches to better serve students’ learning

9. Immersion

  • Tasks and activities should be “cognitively real”, enabling students to immerse themselves to the extent that they think and behave as they would be expected to in the real world
  • Tasks and activities should use the “tools” of the profession to expose students to the culture of the profession
  • Technology should be transparent, adding to, and not distracting from the immersive experience

We have implemented these draft design principles as part of a blended module that made significant use of technology to fundamentally change teaching and learning practices in our physiotherapy department. We’re currently seeing very positive changes in students’ learning behaviours, and clinical reasoning while on placements, although the real benefits of this approach will only really emerge in the next year or so. I will continue to update these principles as I continue my research.

Note: The thesis is still under examination, and these design principles are still very much in draft. They have not been tested in any context other than in our department and will be undergoing refinement as I continue doing postdoctoral work in this area.

Categories
assignments education physiotherapy students

Giving students a voice in Physiotherapy Ethics

I’ve been going through some of the “Professional Ethics” assignments I received from our third year physiotherapy students, and wanted to share this one with you (with the students’ permission). It was written by Basil Buthelezi, and which I think really showcases the wonderful talents our students have, which we would never usually encounter because we focus so much energy on the clinical component of physiotherapy education.

The assignment was to explore the theme of Human rights in South African healthcare, using any media that the students wanted. So far, I’ve received a fictional newspaper front page (which I’m hoping to put up here as well), been directed to this blog, and now this poem by Basil. I wanted to share it because I think it illustrates the potential that students have to amaze us when we give them the opportunity to speak with their own voices. Here’s the poem by Basil Buthelezi…

Site of entertainment (voices personalising HIV / AIDS)

I’m all over,
From the person next to you,
In the neighbourhood and,
All four corners of the world.

They all bow for me,
From TB to Cancer,
From strokes to the paralysed,
Beautiful or ugly,
From infants to the elderly,
Rich or poor,
White or black, “colour with no discrimination”,
But all the negativities in me.

Fair enough,
I’m tired of tears and the angry faces of stranded orphans,
Hopeless,
Harmless,
Hungry,
Homeless,
Their tears have given birth to an ocean.
Yes, my throat is dry, but I can’t drink in this ocean because it’s dirty,
All infected, the attack of vampires is in full swing,
Kill them, kill them all!!
Seize the duplication.

Dollars and dollars,
I have explored their pockets and robbed their monies,
Monies buying antiretrovirals
To keep me low, yet
The dead sentence is coming.

Graves and graves,
If they were coloured red
This world will be red, red
Red for danger
Red bloody red.

The equation is shifting,
Outplaying the moments of pleasure,
Abstain to restore the equilibrium
“Be faithful” is a song of goodwill.

If not!
Pause, before you explore the site of entertainment,
Have you worn a jacket to protect you,
To protect you from hot and juicy stuff?
I know you want to be happy down there…,
But you need a license to enjoy,
Cause I’m like a vampire waiting to attack
And destroy the essence of your life.

Basil Buthelezi (2009)

Categories
education physiotherapy research

Proposal presentation

In our department, we’re required to present our research proposals for comment before submission to Higher Degrees.  This allows the group to give feedback before final corrections in the hope that the proposal is accepted without having to make major revisions.

I’ve just shared my proposal presentation that I gave a few days ago on Slideshare.  The feedback I received, although mainly editorial, means that the structure of this presentation is not the same as it will be in the final submission e.g. the Method has received another step in the process.

Would love any feedback.