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AI education

Comment: Teachers, the Robots Are Coming. But That’s Not a Bad Thing.

…that’s exactly why educators should not be putting their heads in the sand and hoping they never get replaced by an AI-powered robot. They need to play a big role in the development of these technologies so that whatever is produced is ethical and unbiased, improves student learning, and helps teachers spend more time inspiring students, building strong relationships with them, and focusing on the priorities that matter most. If designed with educator input, these technologies could free up teachers to do what they do best: inspire students to learn and coach them along the way.

Bushweller, K. (2020). Teachers, the Robots Are Coming. But That’s Not a Bad Thing. Education Week.

There are a few points in the article that confuse rather than clarify (for example, the conflation of robots with software) but on the whole I think this provides a useful overview of some of the main concerns around the introduction of AI-based systems in education. Personally, I’m not at all worried about having humanoid (or animal-type) physical robots coming into the classroom to take over my job.

I think that AI will be introduced into educational settings more surreptitiously, for example via the institutional LMS in the form of grading assistance, risk identification, timetabling, etc. And we’ll welcome this because it frees us from the very labour intensive, repetitive work that we all complain about. Not only that but grading seems to be one of the most expensive aspects (in terms of time) of a teacher’s job and because of this we’re going to see a lot of interest in this area by governments. For example, see this project by Ofqual (the UK teaching standards regulator) to explore the use of AI to grade school exams.

In fact, I think that AI-based assessment is pretty much inevitable in educational contexts, given that it’ll probably be (a lot) cheaper, more reliable, fair, and valid than human graders.


Shameless self-promotion: I wrote a book chapter about how teachers could play a role in the development of AI-based systems in education, specifically in the areas of data collection, teaching practice, research, and policy development. Here is the full-text (preprint) and here are my slides from a seminar at the University of Cape Town where I presented an overview.

By Michael Rowe

I'm a lecturer in the Department of Physiotherapy at the University of the Western Cape in Cape Town, South Africa. I'm interested in technology, education and healthcare and look for places where these things meet.

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