Twitter Weekly Updates for 2010-12-20

  • dRonaldArendse Boxing day #
  • @Shuayb702 the weather here is ridiculous #
  • @RonaldArendse spending Christmas and birthday with my sister & her family #
  • Just arrived in Durban, the air is wet #
  • Future of education. R we having the right conversation? http://ow.ly/1rYdPe. Ed. & social conditions are inseparable #
  • The Problem of Filters and Silos http://ow.ly/1rYdMu. Big ideas lie @ the edge of our field, where we spend the least time #
  • Which Ideas Are the Good Ones? http://ow.ly/1rYdM1. It may take time to recognise the value of innovating in the curriculum #
  • On my way to Durban for a week, let me know if u want to hang out #
  • Anyone got Cell C 3G USB modem running on Ubuntu 10.10? #
  • Playing around with #SlideRocket a bit. Very cool online presentation tool http://bit.ly/hk6njq #
  • Being Understood Requires Context… http://ow.ly/1rXX8t. When presenting, just giving the facts isn’t enough #
  • Been looking for an online project management tool. #Gantto seems pretty useful (still in beta) http://bit.ly/gnq3ac #
  • OER@UCT | Is the Lecture Dead? http://bit.ly/frv6ii #
  • Are You Making These Dissertation Writing Mistakes? « To Do: Dissertation http://bit.ly/gj1xLa #
  • Just applied to participate in the Chrome OS netbook pilot program. B nice 2 c if online only, all the time is feasible http://bit.ly/hbbYek #
  • Just confirmed my booking for camping at Monks Cowl next week, should be good times http://bit.ly/fKhNa3 #
  • Having lunch at #Barrique fantastic food, beautiful setting, great service. I’m just saying… #
  • RT @roballen101: RT @whiteafrican – Shouldn’t these #ICTD conferences be held in emerging markets, not Europe and the US? #
  • RT @whiteafrican: Turns out there are very few ICT Research projects done by African institutions (9%), or by Africans at all. #ICTD2010 #
  • Thought Leader » Jennifer Thorpe » The medical mutilation of women’s rights http://t.co/jsT6Gwx via @mailandguardian #
  • Tech Leader » Wesley Lynch » E-books: Publishing on the eve of a revolution http://t.co/ijK5Pyu #
  • How 10 Year Olds Explain Cloud Computing – ReadWriteCloud http://rww.to/ifIHfJ. “How big is it? How big do you want it to be?” #
  • Thought Leader » Christmas is sick! http://bit.ly/ihI5id. I have to agree with most of this. Comments are worth a read too #
  • Cellphones in the Classroom: Distraction or Tool? http://rww.to/hC1zYZ #
  • RT @wesleylynch: RT @spillly: When I see someone write a word like Twitterverse or Twitteriffic, I Twow up in my mouth a little #
  • Just voted for HootSuite for Best Social Media Management Tool http://mash.to/2ImZn #MashableAwards #
  • RT @newsfromtengrrl: Blind Students Demand Access to Online Course Materials – The Chronicle of Higher Education http://hoki.es/dPiwiJ #

Twitter Weekly Updates for 2010-07-26

UWC writing for publication retreat: day 2

Today has focused on the practical aspect of publication i.e. actually writing, so we didn’t have as many presentations. We began by reviewing some of what was discussed yesterday and adding a few reflections and comments from participants.

Yesterday, one of the presenters suggested the CARS (link downloads PDF) model for structuring an Introduction. Today, someone suggested that that particular model is based mainly on English language publications from the UK,USA and Australia. Some have suggested the OARO model as an alternative, based on a synthesis of publications from other countries:

Open A Research Option (OARO) model

  • Attract a readership
  • Establish credibility
    • Share background knowledge (own research / anecdotal experiences)
    • Justify the need for the research (answering the “why” question)
    • Present interesting thoughts (who decides what’s “interesting”?)
    • Introduce the general goal
  • Offer a line of enquiry (open questions and explore)
  • Introduce the topic

Remember that it’s difficult to build a model that is based on cross-disciplinary publications.

A review of the writing process

“An increasing number of references in publications may point to a form of academic insecurity”

How well are you telling your own story?

Instead of using pre-defined headings e.g. Discussion, try to highlight the major finding / point and use that for the heading instead

Each phrase should be used to advance your argument. Make sure that the pieces fit together to create a coherent whole.

Writing about the topic begins broadly (macro view) and then narrows to get to the crux of the article (micro view), then expands again to place the results into a broader context e.g. hourglass shape

Review of the literature (because it’s a process, not a thing)

Entering occupied territory” → can be intimidating

Be wary of absolute statements about the review i.e. what it should or shouldn’t do or be

Working with literatures:

  • Locate the work in a field
  • Create a mandate for the research
  • Informs the methods and theorisation
  • Specify the contribution

Learning to speak with authority, adopting a critical yet generous stance to the scholarship of the field, and establishing authority to speak, is an enormous challenge (Kamler & Thomson, 2006)

Find patterns in the literature

Patterns:

  • Chronological
  • Geographical
  • Definitions
  • Genre
  • Concepts
  • Methods
  • General → specific
  • Policy / practice

Try to avoid “Smith et al (2000) have suggested that…”, “They emphasise the following…” Rather, try to put your take on their research first, and then credit the other researchers

Trying to convince the reader that there’s an organising mind at work (Swales, 2004)

Literature review isn’t about constructing a thing, it’s a process that’s embedded throughout the article

Facebook privacy and copyright issues

I know that there’s quite a lot of interest in using Facebook, the social networking site, as a platform for interaction with students (1, 2). Whether that interaction is going to be on a social level (and the implications of that alone are certainly food for thought) or academically, it’s worth taking note of Facebook’s Terms of use, which states that:

“By posting User Content to any part of the Site, you automatically grant, and you represent and warrant that you have the right to grant, to the Company an irrevocable, perpetual, non-exclusive, transferable, fully paid, worldwide license (with the right to sublicense) to use, copy, publicly perform, publicly display, reformat, translate, excerpt (in whole or in part) and distribute such User Content for any purpose, commercial, advertising, or otherwise, on or in connection with the Site or the promotion thereof, to prepare derivative works of, or incorporate into other works, such User Content, and to grant and authorize sublicenses of the foregoing.

And it’s Privacy Policy:

Facebook may also collect information about you from other sources, such as newspapers, blogs, instant messaging services, and other users of the Facebook service through the operation of the service (e.g., photo tags) in order to provide you with more useful information and a more personalized experience. By using Facebook, you are consenting to have your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States.”

I wouldn’t go so far as to say we should avoid using Facebook as a platform for engaging with students. However, I’d strongly urge anyone considering this option to be aware of the fact that Facebook is essentially a closed environment over which you have no control and it seems that the copyright of any and all content published on the site will revert to Facebook, to do with as they will.