I enjoyed reading (April)

program.reading.outside

Sudden site shutdowns and the perils of living our lives online (John Paul Titlow): When Google decided to shut down Reader and made the announcement a few weeks ago, this really made me think carefully about what I do online, and where I decide to do it. Obviously there’s incredible convenience in having someone else host all your stuff, whether it’s on Facebook, Google+ or any other service. They have beautiful user interfaces (sometimes), great sharing features and they are responsible for maintaining the site. But when they decide to close up shop, for whatever reason, there goes all your data. The more I think about it, the more I want to move my online profiles into my own online space.
Guns want to be free: what happens when 3D printing and crypto-anarchy collide? (Joshua Kopstein):

I approve of any development that makes it more difficult for governments and criminals to monopolise the use of force.

I’m not sure yet if this is a good thing or a bad thing. However, right now, it is a thing that we need to think about. The idea of printing weapons is definitely something that needs discussion, but we should also remember that we’ll be able to print other things too, like furniture, utensils, spare parts for devices, etc. The creative force that this will unleash is going to change society, especially when this technology is widely available. One day, 3D printers will be built into your home and will just be a normal part of your consumer experience (see Neil Stephenson’s The Diamond Age).

 

The Mendeley – Elsevier frenzy: I’m not going to summarise the discussion, just wanted to point out a few posts I found thought-provoking. It is interesting to note that a few weeks after the initial announcement, everything died down and the internet has moved on. I wonder how many of those indignant academics actually deleted their accounts? The links below are the posts that I thought were more considered and less irrational and emotional.

 

Network-enabled research (Cameron Neylon):

Suddenly there is the possibility of coordination, of distribution of tasks that was simply not possible before. The internet simply does this better than any other network we have ever had. It is better for a range of reasons but they key ones are: its immense scale – connecting more people, and now machines than any previous network; its connectivity – the internet is incredibly densely connected, essentially enabling any computer to speak to any other computer globally; its lack of friction – transfer of information is very low cost, essentially zero compared to previous technologies, and is very very easy.

 

Teaching as a subversive activity (Rick Snell): This is not a link to the book itself but a summary of the main concepts. I’ve been wanting to read Teaching as a subversive activity for ages, but still haven’t gotten around to it.

…once you have learned how to ask questions – relevant and appropriate and substantial questions – you have leaned how to learn and no one can keep you from learning whatever you want or need to know.

Twitter Weekly Updates for 2009-05-17

  • “Encouraging educators to blog” http://bit.ly/2X2hO #
  • Article on PLoS re. management of large digital libraries for academics, together with adding “social” to research http://bit.ly/CWgHE #
  • Blog post discussing different challenges for researchers / scientists in managing their digital libraries http://bit.ly/xrBOT #
  • To err is human: building a safer healthcare system (free book from the National Acadamies Press) http://bit.ly/AdDgO #
  • ASCILITE conferences, a brilliant source of content for anyone interested in technology and education http://bit.ly/EugZP #
  • Inequality in society = high rates of drug /alchol abuse, mental illness, teenage pregnancy, homicide, and low literacy http://bit.ly/KuWEb #
  • Thought provoking post by Steven Downes re. open systems of assessment http://bit.ly/16U0Df #
  • Mendeley blog post on how the software affects journal impact factors and publishing models http://bit.ly/43bCB #

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