Twitter Weekly Updates for 2011-06-13

  • @mpascoe Thanks for pointing that out, here’s the link http://bit.ly/jcxBNr #
  • Tech-savvy doctoral students increasingly look to open web technologies http://bit.ly/jcxBNr (prev tweet has broken link) #
  • @mpascoe wrt students and lecture capture, study was done by a company selling devices for lecture capture…have to wonder about results #
  • One year on « The Thesis Whisperer http://bit.ly/jf84Rw. Interesting comments on what research students came looking for #
  • @sportsdoc_chris Thanks for the FF #
  • @simtho001 Who’s giving the course? What you covering? Would love to know what you thought of it when you’re done #
  • @romieh Great question. On looking further, it seems that the paper was released by a company specialising in lecture capture! #skeptical #
  • BioMed Central Blog : Exploiting the advances of multimedia technology in medical publishing http://bit.ly/l186Ad #
  • BioMed Central Blog : Bringing open access to Africa: BioMed Central announces far-reaching program http://bit.ly/jIktNm #
  • Cultivate your Personal Learning Network http://ow.ly/1tEHl6 #
  • Who Really Owns Your Photos in Social Media? http://ow.ly/1tEHib #
  • Students Rank Lecture Capture ‘Most Important’ Blended Learning Resource http://ow.ly/1tEH8t #
  • Tech-savvy doctoral students increasingly look to open web technologies http://ow.ly/1tEGVJ #
  • Why Augmented Reality Is Poised To Change Marketing http://ow.ly/1tEGOM #
  • Periodic Table welcomes two new, ultraheavy elements, jury still out on the names http://ow.ly/5eHZe #
  • United Nations Proclaims Internet Access a Human Right http://ow.ly/5eHIT #
  • Daily Papert http://bit.ly/muCVu1. Many do not appreciate fully the ways in which digital media can augment intellectual productivity #
  • @RonaldArendse need something to do while waiting for kettle to boil 🙂 #
  • Pic du Midi de Bigorre cloudy Wikimedia Commons.jpg [POTD for June 08 from commons.wikimedia.org] http://ow.ly/5ex2S #
  • Pic du Midi de Bigorre cloudy Wikimedia Commons.jpg [POTD for June 08 from commons.wikimedia.org] http://ow.ly/1tE5Rk #
  • Scottish university to introduce comic studies degree http://ow.ly/1tE5QP #
  • Wikipedia Is “Making the Grade” With More & More Academics http://ow.ly/1tE5Q4 #
  • A few improvements to discussions in Google Docs http://ow.ly/1tDvEU #
  • UCT open educational resource wins 2011 Award for OpenCourseWare Excellence http://ow.ly/1tDvEJ #
  • Introducing: Zotpress http://ow.ly/1tDvrH. Pulling Zotero libraries into WordPress blogs #
  • Daily Papert http://bit.ly/kgoatr. Children’s thinking “has its own kind of order and its own kind of logic” #
  • Technology in Schools: Local fix or Global Transformation? : The Daily Papert http://bit.ly/mIogF8 #

Posted to Diigo 09/19/2010

    • Survey results indicate that the majority of college students prefer courses that offer podcasts over those that do not
    • Students cite convenience, flexibility, and positive impact on learning as the main reasons to have recorded lectures (Nagel, 2008; Fernandez, Simo, & Sallan, 2009)
    • Lecture capture provides additional resources for students: archived lectures, tutorials for lab work, demonstrations of difficult concepts and complex procedures, and presentations by guest speakers;

      • allows students to review material at their own pace and convenience (Coghlan et al., 2007);

      • offers students more flexibility in note-taking;

      • makes time for active learning during class by having the lecture available for viewing before the class meetings (Lund, 2008);

      • allows students to catch up with a missed lecture;

      • offers another tool for student learning projects (e.g., student-generated podcasts for interviewing locals and sharing with peers in a study-abroad program).

    • Although many anecdotal reports about lecture capture circulate in higher education, only a few notable evaluation studies have investigated its impact on student learning
    • No noticeable impact on students’ class attendance
    • In one study, students explained that they continue to attend lecture because it offers opportunities for interaction in a structured learning environment (Copley, 2007)
    • Offering podcasts of lectures has the potential to improve students’ mastery of course material
    • Undergraduate students have reported in focus groups and surveys that podcasts helped them stay focused on the course, made learning more fun and informal, supported independent learning, and enabled deep engagement with course material (Edirisingha & Salmon, 2007; Duke University, 2005)
    • several perceived benefits of lecture capture technology, including the opportunity to make up a missed class, the convenience of watching lectures on demand, and the potential for increased retention of class materials (Veeramani & Bradley, 2008)
    • when students do use podcasts, they use them for specific reasons and at specific times in a course of study
    • Students report that they appreciate the flexibility of accessing podcasts anywhere and anytime (Fernandez, Simo, & Sallan, 2009; Winterbottom, 2007)
    • students who viewed video presentations of lectures with slides tended to back up and repeat slides containing information that they had difficulty understanding (Dey, Burn, & Gerdes, 2009)
    • Although students may appreciate podcasts, this technology tool should not replace traditional learning resources but, instead, should serve as a complement to them (Fernandez, Simo, & Sallan, 2009)
    • studies show that lecture recordings (audio or video) are used mainly to prepare for exams and review course material in order to gain a better understanding of complex topics
    • students usually view podcasts shortly after a lecture has occurred and in the few days before an exam
    • It is important not to assume that all students possess the same technology skills and have had equal exposure and access to technology
    • students without experience and comfort using techonogy may be disadvantaged when class materials must be retrieved from the Web
    • If the podcast will include students’ questions or responses, you should ask students to sign a consent form when the podcast audience is broader than the class itself
    • The availability of lectures in podcast form may change students’ learning behaviors as well as their expectations about the use of class time
    • Since students take fewer or summary style notes in courses using lecture capture (Brotherton & Abowd, 2004), they have more time to process course material on the spot, which may lead them to ask more questions and want more interactivity during lecture
    • Students may, therefore, expect the format of lectures to shift from a process of information transfer to a more student-centered and interactive format
    • As a result, instructors may need to devote more time to in-class activities that enable students to practice skills, think critically about material, and apply what they’ve heard in lecture to grappling with real-world problems (McKenzie, 2008)
    • Recommendations for Using Lecture Capture Effectively
    • 1. Before you start, make sure that you have clear goals for podcasting lectures and the time to prepare them consistently throughout the entire semester

    • 2.Once you decide to podcast, make time to experiment with recording quality. Poor sound quality may prevent students from using the resource
    • 3. Make podcasts available as soon as possible after a lecture
    • 4. If you require students to listen to podcasts before lecture, provide them with content-related questions or other learning activities
    • 5. When podcasts are assigned in advance of a class meeting, use class time for interactive discussion, student-centered learning activities, or demonstrations to complement and build on podcast content
    • 6. Before making podcasts available, be sure that all of your students have access to and are comfortable using devices to download and play podcasts
    • 7. When appropriate, make reference to podcasts during lectures or when responding to students’ questions so that students will be more likely to use them
    • 8. Make accessing and using podcasts easy and fast by providing detailed instructions for downloading and ensuring that the file format is compatible with common media-playing devices
    • 9.Provide students with a clear explanation of instructional goals
    • 10. Draft an evaluation plan for your lecture capture project to investigate what did and didn’t work for you and your students

Posted to Diigo 05/02/2010

    • You can’t force students to pay attention if they don’t want to. And even if you forbid all electronic gadgets, students will still daydream, whisper, and pass notes.
    • You can’t force students to pay attention if they don’t want to.
    • If you permit mobile devices, establish rules of etiquette.
    • Share research findings on task switching that show multitasking students learn significantly less and perform on tests more poorly than students who focus solely on classwork.
    • Survey results indicate that the majority of college students prefer courses that offer podcasts over those that do not. Students cite convenience, flexibility, and positive impact on learning as the main reasons to have recorded lectures (Nagel, 2008; Fernandez, Simo, & Sallan, 2009).
    • Lecture capture
    • archived lectures
    • allows students to review material at their own pace and convenience (Coghlan et al., 2007)
    • offers students more flexibility in note-taking
    • makes time for active learning during class by having the lecture available for viewing before the class meetings (Lund, 2008)
    • allows students to catch up with a missed lecture
    • No noticeable impact on students’ class attendance
    • In surveys, students report gaining a better understanding of class material in courses that used the technology
    • Undergraduate students have reported in focus groups and surveys that podcasts helped them stay focused on the course, made learning more fun and informal, supported independent learning, and enabled deep engagement with course material (Edirisingha & Salmon, 2007; Duke University, 2005)

    • Some students have reported that, because they had access to this learning tool outside of class, they took fewer notes during class and were able to pay closer attention to the lecture (Brotherton & Abowd, 2004)
    • Students report that they appreciate the flexibility of accessing podcasts anywhere and anytime (Fernandez, Simo, & Sallan, 2009; Winterbottom, 2007), and they like resources that are presented in a video or audio format, since this allows for self-paced learning and multitasking

    • students usually view podcasts shortly after a lecture has occurred and in the few days before an exam (Copley, 2007)
    • When considering the use of lecture capture technology, faculty should also understand students’ technological competencies. It is important not to assume that all students possess the same technology skills and have had equal exposure and access to technology (e.g., computers and MP3 players)

    • Given the potential differences in levels of access and technological skills, instructors may want to consider administering a short survey at the beginning of the term to determine students’ comfort with and access to technology required for using lecture capture (Zhu & Kaplan, 2011)

    • Since students take fewer or summary style notes in courses using lecture capture (Brotherton & Abowd, 2004), they have more time to process course material on the spot, which may lead them to ask more questions and want more interactivity during lecture

    • Make podcasts available as soon as possible after a lecture, since most students download podcasts within a few days of a given lecture
    • When appropriate, make reference to podcasts during lectures or when responding to students’ questions
    • Provide students with a clear explanation of instructional goals and technical requirements if podcasts are used for student projects or assignments.
    • the digital divide in education goes beyond the issue of access to technology.  A second digital divide separates those with the competencies and skills to benefit from computer use from those without.”
    • the digital divide is as much about access to reliable power as it is about access to ICT.
    • ICT use holds very real promise for facilitating greater inclusion of such groups into existing educational practices and environments as well — but such inclusion is by no means automatic, despite what countless pictures of happy children with computers from all walks of life might imply.
    • But do we really need to repeat the mistakes of others? If adopting ‘best practice’ is fraught with difficulties, and ‘good practice’ often noted but ignored, perhaps it is useful instead to look at ‘worst practice’.
    • 1. Dump hardware in schools, hope for magic to happen
    • 2. Design for OECD learning environments, implement elsewhere. Sometimes this works, but unfortunately many places roll out programs and products that have at their core sets of assumptions (reliable electricity and connectivity, well-trained teachers, sufficient available time-on-task, highly literate students, space to implement student-centric pedagogies, relevant content, a variety of cultural norms, etc.) that do not correspond with local realities.
    • 3. Think about educational content only after you have rolled out your hardware. It is a fact that, in many places, only once computers are in place and a certain level of basic ICT literacy is imparted to teachers and students is the rather basic question asked: What are we going to do with all of this stuff?
    • 4. Assume you can just import content from somewhere else. Much effort typically needs to be expended to map this content to explicit objectives and activities in the local curricula.
    • 5. Don’t monitor, don’t evaluate. What is the impact of ICT use in education? If we don’t evaluate potential answers to this question, rigorously and credibly, all we are left with is well-intentioned guesswork and marketing dross.
    • 6. Make a big bet on an unproven technology (especially one based on a  closed/proprietary standard) or single vendor, don’t plan for how to avoid ‘lock-in
    • 7. Don’t think about (or acknowledge) total cost of ownership/operation issues or calculations. We know that “total cost of ownership or operation” (TCO) is often underestimated, sometimes grossly, when calculating costs of ICT in education initiatives in developing countries.
    • 8. Assume away equity issues. Introduction of ICT in schools often exacerbates various entrenched inequities in education systems (urban-rural, rich-poor, boy-girl, linguistic and cultural divides, special needs students — the list is long)
    • 9. Don’t train your teachers (nor your school headmasters, for that matter). Teacher training is critical to the success of such initiatives.
    • Many of the lessons, or ‘worst’ practices that you describe can also be easily transferred over to the use of ICT in the health sector, so all nine points are applicable to us too.
    • technology can empower people, but not if their most basic needs are not met (i.e., safe water, sanitation, security).