Twitter Weekly Updates for 2010-06-28

Misunderstanding the conversation around teaching with technology

I’ve been going through the collection of abstracts from last year’s HELTASA conference, looking for a citation for a poster presentation that I’d like to use for an assignment. This gave me an overview of the event that I didn’t pick up on while I was there, as I tend to focus on individual presentations while at conferences.

One of the other things I noticed is that when talking about e-learning (besides the fact that there are many interpretations of what e-learning actually means), many presenters spoke of a move towards customised Learning Management Systems, that exist separate to the lecture. There is still a clear demarcation between the classroom and the online space, with little in each space to complement the other. The only thing that changed in some cases was the way in which learning tasks are assigned and marks gathered i.e. how learning was managed.

I think there’s still a strong belief that “teaching with technology” merely involves moving content online and into digital walled gardens, cut off not only from the greater online community, but even from students who aren’t registered for that particular module. There seemed to be a lack of understanding that the most important aspect of introducing technology into teaching, is that there must be a change in practice that is associated with multiple, bi-directional communication channels. Even the addition of multimedia shouldn’t be seen as an end in itself…it’s just a way to add meaning to the message.

This change in communication is what is fundamental. It’s about moving ideas, as well as moving between and through them in a way that’s difficult to do in a traditional lecture format, but which complements the lecture (or small group discussion, etc.). We need to move away from the idea that integrating technology into teaching practice is an either – or proposition. The traditional and the new need to blend into each other, using each strategy to reduce the limitations of the other.

Twitter Weekly Updates for 2010-01-11

Powered by Twitter Tools

First article published

I just had my first research article published. It’s based mainly on the literature review I did for my Masters degree last year, with a few updates. It’s strange, but when I submitted it about 6 months ago, I thought it was a reasonable piece of work. Reading it now, I feel like taking it back and editing the hell out of it. Does anyone else look back at their earliest work and feel like hiding under a table?

I’m putting the abstract up here in case anyone is interested. The title of the article is “Information and communication technology in health: a review of the literature”.

Abstract

Information and communication technology has been shown to be increasingly important in the education andprofessional practice of healthcare workers. The World Health Organisation (WHO) discusses the benefits of using ICT in the Primary Healthcare setting in terms of better access to information, improved communication between colleagues, facilitating continuing professional development and providing learning tools for healthcareprofessionals, patients and the community as a whole. This review of the literature describes the role of information and communication technology (ICT) in the education and professional practice of healthcare workers and goes on to outline the challenges facing the widespread adoption of ICT. The conclusion is that ICT does indeed have a positive role to play in both the education and professional practice of healthcare workers, including physiotherapists, as long as it is implemented as an adjunct to established and proven practice, and not a replacement.

Conference: Higher education as a social space

I just found out that the abstract I submitted for the Higher Education as a Social Space conference has been accepted.  I’ll be presenting a paper on the use of ICT by physiotherapy students
in South Africa, based on the results of my masters thesis.

The conference will take place in Grahamstown from the 30 November to the 03 December and will include the following themes:

  • Institutional development (including quality management and enhancement)
  • Curriculum in higher education (including teaching, learning and assessment)
  • Academic staff development
  • Student development
  • Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) in teaching and learning

Obviously my main interest is in the use of ICTs in teaching and learning, but I’m hoping to attend a few presentations looking at curriculum in HE.