Twitter Weekly Updates for 2012-05-21

  • @RonaldArendse nice, who made it? #
  • RT @engadget: Neuroscientists develop game for stroke rehabilitation, give the Wii a run for its money http://t.co/TX6Un7bB #
  • Giving iPad PowerPoint Presentations Just Got a Lot Better http://t.co/YLBI0WLM via @zite #
  • Knowledge Graph A Great New Service from Google http://t.co/EskrzxDU via @zite #
  • @RonaldArendse congrats on your mention in the paper. Good work with cellphones for T&L in large classes 🙂 #
  • @RonaldArendse where’s the link? #
  • TED: Brené Brown: Listening to shame (2012) http://t.co/Amo1VBwm. Great follow up to the 2010 talk #
  • @HENNAWP U can export the map as an image & embed it / link to it, u can also link to the Cmap file & allow others to download it #checet #
  • “Information” is fragmented, “knowledge” is integrated. Concept mapping helps to turn information into knowledge #checet #
  • @sam_a19 initially it would take some time but thereafter it only requires refinement #checet #
  • @AatikaValentyn The Cmap file can be emailed. It only needs the software to be installed on the machine you use to open the file #checet #
  • Using concept maps to articulate & externalise conceptual understanding can also improve essay writing #checet #
  • Here is the presentation i gave this morning on PLEs http://t.co/TBDrR8ke #checet #
  • @KarienJooste you can embed a twitter feed (from a person, hashtag, or search) into a wiki #checet #
  • David Gelernter: Time to start taking the Internet seriously http://t.co/lDR62M5K. Great piece that changed my thinking #checet #
  • @dgachago17 “getting the story out there” also a process, no emphasis on product. If product is “poor”, has learning happened? #checet #
  • @dgachago17 the “purpose is to give students a voice”…isn’t that a process…the “giving” of the voice? #checet #
  • @IvalaEunice The devices are mobile, and because it’s wireless the students can respond from anywhere? #checet #
  • @waldoweimers Switch to pencil & paper. It’ll save on the “battery” concern, but cost you time #checet #
  • @jpbosman talks about using cellphones & wireless for audience response systems, instead of clickers which are expensive #checet #
  • @AatikaValentyn U can argue that digital literacy is as NB as reading & writing. And, they are an aspect of digital communication #checet #
  • Ethical aspects of recording and sharing encounters, while relevant, are not prohibitive. Obtain informed consent from participants #checet #
  • @dgachago17 I think that “process” is way more valuable than “product” 🙂 #checet #
  • @JonathanMarks3 “Learning the technology” should be an essential component of learning in a connected society #checet #
  • Vodcasting requires students to draw on / develop multiple skillsets that are not necessarily a formal part of the curriculum #checet #
  • @Phudsical backchannels are easier if you have an assistant who is familiar with the course to manage the background conversation #checet #
  • @waldoweimers Twitter constrains you by limiting the message to 140 characters. So, shorter, more concise expressions than blogging #checet #
  • @drekpo Thank you, hopefully today will also be useful 🙂 #
  • Students using vodcasts at Pollsmoor Prison to document their fieldwork skills and submit for assessment in Social Work degree #checet #
  • Neal Henderson talks about his students using video podcasts: visual experience / communication adds value to the assessment #checet #
  • RT @NicSpaull: When I read CS Lewis quotes I imagine him sitting in an old armchair smiling, and chuckling lightly just before he says it… #
  • RT @NatGeo: What makes us human? http://t.co/QEa9e2hn (via @NatGeoEducation) #
  • “Lurking” = listening to the background conversation without actively contributing = a form of legitimate peripheral participation #checet #
  • Think of a hashtag as a record of the background thoughts and feelings of an event like #checet #
  • @dgachago17 kicks it off at #checet integrating Twitter into practice, “the distance between people becomes smaller” #

Posted to Diigo 08/17/2011

I did a lot of reading and highlighting the other night, which is why this is so long. I’ve been bookmarking a lot of articles (about 400 at the last count) over the past 6 months or so, and will be trying to get through them over the next few months. There might be more long posts like this one (aggregationsof Diigo highlights) as a consequence.

    • I truly believe that a combination of actively influencing a story line in combination with a reaction upon the decisions taken would make learners feel more appreciated or valued if you will and encourage them to continue learning with that program instead of only getting negative feedback in from of a summary assessment when a chapter or course is finished
    • According to Rita Kop PLE is a UK term and PLN an American term. Dave Cormier questions whether the term personal should be used at all. Stephen Downes points out that personal is an OK term if you think about [Personal Learning] Network as opposed to [Personal] Learning Network – and similarly for PLE
    • the words are not as important as the process
    • a Personal Learning Environment (PLE) is more concerned with tools and technology and that Personal Learning Networks (PLN) are more concerned with connections to people
    • The PLE takes me to my PLN through various gates and paths
    • they’re the ticket and ride, not the destination
    • The PLN is then more akin to a community, but with much looser connections, described in the literature as “weak ties”
    • possible roles involved in networked learning that the teacher may be classified as (Expert: Someone with sustained contribution to a field, Teacher: experts with authority, Curator: play the role of interpreting, organizing, and presenting content, Facilitator: able to guide, direct, lead, and assist learners, not necessarily being a subject matter expert
    • why focus on PLEs? Shouldn’t we be trying to figure out how to make PLN work better?
    • Development of your PLE is about working with technology, refining your use of tools to give you more keys or more efficient access to your network of people and resources
    • “Pundits may be asking if the Internet is bad for our children’s mental development, but the better question is whether the form of learning and knowledge-making we are instilling in our children is useful to their future.”
    • we can’t keep preparing students for a world that doesn’t exist
    • The contemporary American classroom, with its grades and deference to the clock, is an inheritance from the late 19th century. During that period of titanic change, machines suddenly needed to run on time. Individual workers needed to willingly perform discrete operations as opposed to whole jobs. The industrial-era classroom, as a training ground for future factory workers, was retooled to teach tasks, obedience, hierarchy and schedules.
    • Teachers and professors regularly ask students to write papers. Semester after semester, year after year, “papers” are styled as the highest form of writing.
      • And yet they will probably never have to communicate anything in that format ever again…unless they also become academics
    • question the whole form of the research paper
    • “What if bad writing is a product of the form of writing required in school — the term paper — and not necessarily intrinsic to a student’s natural writing style or thought process?”
    • A classroom suited to today’s students should de-emphasize solitary piecework
    • That classroom needs new ways of measuring progress, tailored to digital times — rather than to the industrial age or to some artsy utopia where everyone gets an Awesome for effort.
    • Blended learning lets designers split off prerequisite material from the rest  of a course
    • Blended learning lets instructional designers separate rote content focusing  on lower-order thinking skills, which can be easily taught online, from critical  thinking skills, which many instructors feel more comfortable addressing  in the classroom
    • Learners can have more meaningful conversations about these  topics because they have developed a familiarity with basic management  policies and procedures and have had time to integrate what they know into  their thinking
    • We cannot have it both ways: quality of thinking and speed are anathema to each other.
    • Covering content is daunting enough, but providing the time necessary to indulge in the quality conversations that make learning truly engaging is almost impossible
    • the challenge of articulating thoughts quickly
    • post two dynamic questions online each night. These questions have many possible answers, require analysis of content and the creation of unique ideas
    • when we revisit these discussions in the classroom, students have a plethora of ideas to share. They are no longer scared to speak out because they have a confidence born from their online discussions and the validation of their peers
    • weave those online conversations back into the classroom
      • “Some students have great ideas, but they experience difficulty expressing those ideas clearly.
    • Good practice in undergraduate education:
    • We address the teacher’s how, not the subject-matter what, of good  practice in undergraduate education. We recognize that content and pedagogy interact in  complex ways.
    • An undergraduate education should prepare students to  understand and deal intelligently with modern life.
    • 1. Encourages Contact Between Students and Faculty  Frequent student-faculty contact in and out of classes is the most   important factor in student motivation and involvement. Faculty   concern helps students get through rough times and keep on working.   Knowing a few faculty members well enhances students’ intellectual   commitment and encourages them to think about their own values and   future plans.
    • 2. Develops Reciprocity and Cooperation Among Students  Learning is enhanced when it is more like a team effort that a   solo race. Good learning, like good work, is collaborative and social,   not competitive and isolated. Working with others often increases   involvement in learning. Sharing one’s own ideas and responding to   others’ reactions sharpens thinking and deepens understanding.
    • 3. Encourages Active Learning  Learning is not a spectator sport. Students do not learn much just   by sitting in classes listening to teachers, memorizing pre-packaged   assignments, and spitting out answers. They must talk about what they   are learning, write about it, relate it to past experiences and apply   it to their daily lives. They must make what they learn part of   themselves.
    • 4. Gives Prompt Feedback  Knowing what you know and don’t know focuses learning. Students   need appropriate feedback on performance to benefit from courses.   When getting started, students need help in assessing existing   knowledge and competence. In classes, students need frequent   opportunities to perform and receive suggestions for improvement. At   various points during college, and at the end, students need chances   to reflect on what they have learned, what they still need to know,   and how to assess themselves.
    • 5. Emphasizes Time on Task  Time plus energy equals learning. There is no substitute for time   on task. Learning to use one’s time well is critical for students and   professionals alike. Students need help in learning effective time   management. Allocating realistic amounts of time means effective   learning for students and effective teaching for faculty. How an   institution defines time expectations for students, faculty,   administrators, and other professional staff can establish the basis   of high performance for all.
    • 6. Communicates High Expectations  Expect more and you will get more. High expectations are important   for everyone — for the poorly prepared, for those unwilling to exert   themselves, and for the bright and well motivated. Expecting students   to perform well becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy when teachers and   institutions hold high expectations for themselves and make extra  efforts.
    • 7. Respects Diverse Talents and Ways of Learning  There are many roads to learning. People bring different talents   and styles of learning to college. Brilliant students in the seminar   room may be all thumbs in the lab or art studio. Students rich in   hands-on experience may not do so well with theory. Students need the   opportunity to show their talents and learn in ways that work for them.   Then they can be pushed to learn in new ways that do not come so easily.
    • tell real stories from your own life in a way that is relevant and engaging to your audience. If more people could just remember that great speeches or presentations leverage the power of the speaker’s own stories
    • we must not talk ourselves out of being who we really are
    • People do not care about your excuses, they care only about seeing your authentic self
    • People crave authenticity just about more than anything else, and one way to be your authentic self and connect with an audience is by using examples and stories from your own life that illuminate your message in an engaging, memorable way

Twitter Weekly Updates for 2011-04-18