I enjoyed reading (January)

This post is also a bit delayed, but I’m OK with that. During January I found myself reading a bit more than usual about robots, androids, augmented reality and related topics. I’m not sure why it worked out that way, but this collection is more or less representative of what I found interesting during that time. Interestingly, I realised that a common thread throughout this theme are that they’re pretty much related to three books by Daniel Suarez; Daemon, Freedom, and Kill Decision. If you enjoy this kind of thing, you have to read them.

I, Glasshole: My Year With Google Glass (Mat Honan): I’m fascinated with the concept of wearable, context-aware devices and services, of which Glass is simply the most well-known. I think that the ability to overlay digital information on top of the reality we perceive represents an astounding change in how we experience the world.

For much of 2013, I wore the future across my brow, a true Glasshole peering uncertainly into the post-screen world. I’m not out here all alone, at least not for long. The future is coming to your face too. And your wrist. Hell, it might even be in your clothes. You’re going to be wearing the future all over yourself, and soon. When it comes to wearable computing, it’s no longer a question of if it happens, only when and why and can you get in front of it to stop it with a ball-pein hammer? (Answers: Soon. Because it is incredibly convenient. Probably not.) In a few years, we might all be Glassholes. But in 2013, maybe for the last time, I was in dubiously exclusive face-computing company.

Robots of death, robots of love: The reality of android soldiers and why laws for robots are doomed to failure (Steve Ranger): The idea of fully autonomous robots that are able to make decisions in critical situations is both disturbing and appealing to me. Disturbing because embedding a moral framework that can deal with the complexity of warfare is ethically problematic. Appealing because in many situations, robots may actually be able to make better decisions than human beings (think of self-driving cars).

While fully autonomous robot weapons might not be deployed for two or three decades, the International Committee for Robot Arms Control (ICRAC), an international group of academics and experts concerned about the implications of a robot arms race, argues a prohibition on the development and deployment of autonomous weapons systems is the correct approach. “Machines should not be allowed to make the decision to kill people,” it states.

Better Than Human: Why Robots Will — And Must — Take Our Jobs (Kevin Kelly): Kevin Kelly’s article, We are the web, was one of the first things I read that profoundly changed the way I think about the internet. Needless to say, I almost always find his thoughts on technology to be insightful and thought-provoking.

All the while, robots will continue their migration into white-collar work. We already have artificial intelligence in many of our machines; we just don’t call it that. Witness one piece of software by Narrative Science (profiled in issue 20.05) that can write newspaper stories about sports games directly from the games’ stats or generate a synopsis of a company’s stock performance each day from bits of text around the web. Any job dealing with reams of paperwork will be taken over by bots, including much of medicine. Even those areas of medicine not defined by paperwork, such as surgery, are becoming increasingly robotic. The rote tasks of any information-intensive job can be automated. It doesn’t matter if you are a doctor, lawyer, architect, reporter, or even programmer: The robot takeover will be epic.

And it has already begun.

A review of Her (Ray Kurzweil): Kurweil’s thinking on the merging of human beings with technology is fascinating. If you’re interested in this topic, the collection of essays on his blog is awesome.

With emerging eye-mounted displays that project images onto the wearer’s retinas and also look out at the world, we will indeed soon be able to do exactly that. When we send nanobots into the brain — a circa-2030s scenario by my timeline — we will be able to do this with all of the senses, and even intercept other people’s emotional responses.

Twitter Weekly Updates for 2010-07-12

  • Halfway through Freedom by D. Suarez. It’s as un-put-down-able as Daemon. Without a doubt, 2 of the most riveting books I’ve read in years #
  • Home from #ottertrail It was a lot harder than I remember, but still beautiful. Will have some pics up in a day or so #
  • Leaving on the #ottertrail now. Exciting stuff 🙂 No more online for a week #

Posted to Diigo 06/21/2010

    • So little of what we read or see in the field of online learning is concerned with providing people with the tools they need to create their own freedom. “The master’s tools will never dismantle the master’s house.”
    • In these tools there is, and will always be, embedded a dependence back to the originator of the tool, back to the system of mass that makes it both possible and necessary
    • I work with and for what I believe the internet truly is – an explosion of capacity thrust into the hands of people worldwide, the instrument not only for the greatest outburst of creativity and self-expression ever seen, but also of the greatest autonomy and self-determination, and as well on top of that an unparalleled mechanism for cooperation and cohesion
    • The freedom of each of us to form and to have and to share our own thoughts, created by us, contributed freely to the world, and a society built, not on the basis of a propagation of ideas, but rather, on the basis of a gathering of them

Twitter Weekly Updates for 2010-02-15

  • @ryantracey Agreed. The process, rather than the certificate, should be emphasised #
  • RT @wesleylynch: Video comparing iphone and nexus – http://ow.ly/17iBb. Can’t imagine how the iPhone will survive, Android is already better #
  • RT @psychemedia: Are Higher Degrees a waste of time for most people? http://bit.ly/buKpOW. IT professionals are hardly “most people” #
  • University finds free online classes don’t hurt enrollment http://bit.ly/9zztuR #
  • Mobile Learning Principles – interesting, but unrealistic in a developing country. “Mobile” does not = smartphone http://bit.ly/97WUu4 #
  • Presenting while people are twittering, an increasingly common backchannel. Be aware of it and use it if possible http://bit.ly/bymSUE #
  • Presentation Zen: The “Lessig Method” of presentation. Great resource on improving your presentation skills http://bit.ly/aTykYr #
  • About “P”! « Plearn Blog. This post raises some interesting questions about the challenges of using PLEs http://bit.ly/9cDqd6 #
  • Crazy Goats. I don’t usually share this sort of thing, but this pretty amazing http://bit.ly/9Hg32e #
  • Learning technologies in engineering education. For anyone interested in integrating “distance” with “practical” http://bit.ly/a9lclC #
  • Think ‘Network Structure’ not ‘Networking’. I always thought “networking” was too haphazard to bother with http://bit.ly/acuw1g #
  • Clifton beach earlier today. I think I like it here http://twitgoo.com/dv85w #
  • @davidworth Hi David, thanks for the blog plug #
  • @sharingnicely: go around institutional pushback when policy is unfriendly to OER #OCW #
  • @dkeats: free content enables students to use scarce financial resources to acquire tech instead, which grants access to vastly more content #
  • Butcher: the curricular framework must drive development of OER – content comes after learning #OCW #
  • Neil Butcher from OERAfrica: OER can’t work without institutional support #OCW #
  • Why is copyright in OER even an issue? Copyright applies equally to OER and non-OER #OCW #
  • If you think of a degree as a learning experience, rather than a certificate, formal accreditation is less important. See P2PU #OCW #
  • Is there a difference between OER and #OCW I’m wary of the emphasis on content as a means of changing teaching practice #
  • @dkeats Improvement in quality is always important, isn’t it? No-one is aiming for mediocrity #
  • OCW workshop at UWC today, OCW board present incl. MIT OCW, should be a good day, quite proud its happening here #
  • RT @cristinacost: RT @gconole: Sarah Knight on JISC elearning prog including excellent eff. practice pubs http://bit.ly/c1wVF6 #
  • RT @c4lpt: MicroECoP – Uisng microblogging to enhance communication within Communities of Practice http://bit.ly/9ofx3O #microecop #
  • Making the Pop Quiz More Positive. I like the change of mindset that the post suggests, pop quizzes aren’t punishment http://bit.ly/d5IiMV #
  • @cristinacost Looks good, you’re further along with your project than I am with mine, I might have to come to you for advice 🙂 #
  • Problem-Based Learning: A Quick Review « Teaching Professor. Nice, short summary of why PBL is a Good Thing http://bit.ly/cOAQeY #
  • @cristinacost What’s your interest in Buddypress? I recently set up WPMU/BP platform for physio dept social network to explore CoP #
  • Microblogging to enhance communication within communities of practice http://bit.ly/a0saa4 #microecop #
  • There’s a war goin’ on here, donchaknow? Retro copyright posters at EdTechPost http://bit.ly/aBsVwu #
  • Post by Howard Rheingold on crap detection on the internet should be required reading for everyone online http://bit.ly/dsGtha #
  • Scroll down for the 5 C’s of Engagement on Postrank’s “What it is” page. Is it useful for building social presence? http://bit.ly/983dcL #
  • Great post on 3 strategies to manage information: Aggregate, Filter and Connect. The last one is hard (for me anyway) http://bit.ly/diItNr #
  • Great post on the importance of not only filtering information, but using it meaningfully http://bit.ly/bk21Ol #
  • Siemens’ post on moving from educational reform within the system, to a “no boundaries” approach http://bit.ly/bMnKXu #
  • Web 3.0 and Its Relevance for Instruction – interesting article on how a next generation web could be used in education http://bit.ly/axYyEr #
  • Freedom helps kids learn more « Education Soon http://bit.ly/bBbGvB #

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Manuel Castells lecture

I was fortunate to be able to attend a lecture on campus today, given by Manuel Castells, the renowned sociologist and one of the foremost scholars of communication in the information age. His talk was inspirational and quite personal, dealing with his own journey which was a treat, since apparently he rarely talks about much of his personal life.

There were a few ideas he mentioned that really struck me. The first was his comment that ever since he was quite young, he had wanted two main things from the “project” of his life; to be free, and to understand the world better in order to change it. He went on to explain how he reasoned that the breathing room required to achieve these things could be found in academia. He also commented that his students always come first, that they constantly challenge him, and are his sources of inspiration, motivation and interestingly, information. I love those themes; that the freedom to change the world can be found in academia, and that our students are our focus.

He’s recently finished a new book, “Communication power“, which he feels will be even more influential than any of his previous works (although he kind of has to say that if he wants to sell this one).