First compute no harm

Is it acceptable for algorithms today, or an AGI in a decade’s time, to suggest withdrawal of aggressive care and so hasten death? Or alternatively, should it recommend persistence with futile care? The notion of “doing no harm” is stretched further when an AI must choose between patient and societal benefit. We thus need to […]

The AI Threat to Democracy

With the advent of strong reinforcement learning…, goal-oriented strategic AI is now very much a reality. The difference is one of categories, not increments. While a supervised learning system relies upon the metrics fed to it by humans to come up with meaningful predictions and lacks all capacity for goal-oriented strategic thinking, reinforcement learning systems […]

How to ensure safety for medical artificial intelligence

When we think of AI, we are naturally drawn to its power to transform diagnosis and treatment planning and weigh up its potential by comparing AI capabilities to those of humans. We have yet, however, to look at AI seriously through the lens of patient safety. What new risks do these technologies bring to patients, […]

AI at Google: Our principles

Be socially beneficial Avoid creating or reinforcing unfair bias Be built and tested for safety Be accountable to people Incorporate privacy design principles Uphold high standards of scientific excellence Be made available for uses that accord with these principles Source: AI at Google: Our principles This list isn’t a bad start if you’re looking for […]

IPE course project update

This post is cross-posted from the International Ethics Project site. My 4th year students have recently completed the first writing task in the IEP course pilot project. I thought I’d post a quick update on the process using screenshots to illustrate how the course is being run. We’re using a free version of WordPress which […]

Introducing the Humanities into physiotherapy education

This post has been modified and published on The Conversation: Africa as Physiotherapy students have much to learn from the humanities. I’m increasingly drawn to the idea of integrating some aspect of the Humanities into undergraduate physiotherapy education. We focus (almost) all of the curriculum on the basic sciences and then the clinical sciences, which has a certain […]

First draft of article on Informed Consent for the Clinical Teacher

Featured image “Diverging paths” by SDJ on Deviant Art. I’ve just finished the first draft of my 13th article in the Clinical Teacher mobile app. It’s been a LONG time since I’ve managed to put some effort into this project, mainly for personal reasons (my second daughter was born in March last year and we […]

The Oxford tutorial: Interesting ideas for learning

Earlier this year, I tried a new approach in my Professional Ethics class. I start the class by introducing a concept that is relevant to the students’ professional development in the context of our ethics module. I link the concept to something current and relevant that we could anchor the weeks topic to. For example, […]

Physiotherapy in 2050: Ethical and clinical implications

This post describes a project that I began earlier this week with my 3rd year undergraduate students as part of their Professional Ethics module. The project represents a convergence of a few ideas that have been bouncing around in my head for a couple of years and are now coming together as a result of […]

I enjoyed reading (September)

I’m going to be presenting at The Network: Towards Unity for Health conference in Fortaleza, Brazil later this year and so my reading has largely been focused around what I’m thinking of talking about. I haven’t formalised the structure of the presentation yet but will probably publish it here as I figure out what I […]

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