Comment: In competition, people get discouraged by competent robots

After each round, participants filled out a questionnaire rating the robot’s competence, their own competence and the robot’s likability. The researchers found that as the robot performed better, people rated its competence higher, its likability lower and their own competence lower.

Lefkowitz, M. (2019). In competition, people get discouraged by competent robots. Cornell Chronicle.

This is worth noting since it seems increasingly likely that we’ll soon be working, not only with more competent robots but also with more competent software. There are already concerns around how clinicians will respond to the recommendations of clinical decision-support systems, especially when those systems make suggestions that are at odds with the clinician’s intuition.

Paradoxically, the effect may be even worse with expert clinicians who may not always be able to explain their decision-making. Novices, who use more analytical frameworks (or even basic algorithms like, IF this, THEN that) may find it easier to modify their decisions because their reasoning is more “visible” (System 2). Experts, who rely more on subconscious pattern recognition (System 1), may be less able to identify where in their reasoning process they were victim to confounders like confirmation or availability bia, and so less likely to modify their decisions.

It seems really clear that we need to start thinking about how we’re going to prepare current and future clinicians for the arrival of intelligent agents in the clinical context. If we start disregarding the recommendations of clinical decision support systems, not because they produce errors in judgement but because we simply don’t like them, then there’s a strong case to be made that it is the human that we cannot trust.


Contrast this with automation bias, which is the tendency to give more credence to decisions made by machines because of a misplaced notion that algorithms are simply more trustworthy than people.