Clinical Teacher development progress

It’s been a long time since I’ve written about my Clinical Teacher mobile app, so I thought I’d write a short post to highlight the progress that has been made over the past few months. Thanks a ton to the amazing team at Snapplify, who are making this project possible.

First up, after a long time of being iOS-only, the app is now available on any Android device through Google’s Play store, as well as through the browser. This effectively means that you can now access the Clinical Teacher content on any internet-enabled device. Once the content has been downloaded to the mobile app, it will be available offline.

The Clinical Teacher available through Google's Play Store.
The Clinical Teacher available through Google’s Play Store.

The app has also recently been updated to include bug fixes and minor UI improvements. However, we are due for another update in the next few weeks that will mean that content bought on any platform will be available on any other platform. So, if you’ve bought content in the iOS app, then it’ll be available online in the browser, or on Android. Right now, if you purchase content in the browser you won’t be able to sync it to the app until after the upcoming update.

An index of the content available through the browser-based version of the app.
An index of the content available through the browser-based version of the app.

There’s also some new content, including Effective lectures, Case-based learning and How to write Systematic Reviews. I’m going to begin working on a few more articles, which I hope to have finished in the next few months.

So, as you can see, development on the app is moving along nicely, the content is being developed and published and . If you’d like to write something for the Clinical Teacher, let me know about your idea so that we can get you started.

Twitter Weekly Updates for 2012-02-27

Mobile computing

A few weeks ago I presented at an e-learning colloquium here on campus, where I briefly summed up a few ideas of where I think technology can add value to education.  One of the points I finished with, was the idea that computing is becoming more mobile, with cellphones taking over roles traditionally attributed to laptops.

I just wanted to point out this article suggesting that an iPhone may be a suitable laptop replacement.  No definite conclusion is reached in the article, but there are a few interesting ideas presented.

Here’s the link:
http://theappleblog.com/2008/10/28/iphone-as-a-laptop-replacement/

It should be noted that the blog in question is “The Apple blog“, so objectivity may be lacking 🙂