The conversation about unconscious bias in artificial intelligence often focuses on algorithms that unintentionally cause disproportionate harm to entire swaths of society…But the problem could run much deeper than that. Society should be on guard for another twist: the possibility that nefarious actors could seek to attack artificial intelligence systems by deliberately introducing bias into them, smuggled inside the data that helps those systems learn.

Source: Yeung, D. (2018). When AI Misjudgment Is Not an Accident.

I’m not sure how this might apply to clinical practice but, given our propensity for automation bias, it seems that this is the kind of thing that we need to be aware of. It’s not just that algorithms will make mistakes but that people may intentionally set them up to do so by introducing biased data into the training dataset. Instead of hacking into databases to steal data, we may start seeing database hacks that insert new data into them, with the intention of changing our behaviour.

What this suggests is that bias is a systemic challenge—one requiring holistic solutions. Proposed fixes to unintentional bias in artificial intelligence seek to advance workforce diversity, expand access to diversified training data, and build in algorithmic transparency (the ability to see how algorithms produce results).

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