Technology Beyond the Tools

You didn’t need to know about how to print on a printing press in order to read a printed book. Writing implements were readily available in various forms in order to record thoughts, as well as communicate with them. The use was simple requiring nothing more than penmanship. The rapid advancement of technology has changed this. Tech has evolved so quickly and so universally in our culture that there is now literacy required in order for people to effectively and efficiently use it.

Reading and writing as a literacy was hard enough for many of us, and now we are seeing that there is a whole new literacy that needs to be not only learned, but taught by us as well.

Source: Whitby, T. (2018). Technology Beyond the Tools.

I wrote about the need to develop these new literacies in a recent article (under review) in OpenPhysio. From the article:

As clinicians become single nodes (and not even the most important nodes) within information networks, they will need data literacy to read, analyse, interpret and make use of vast data sets. As they find themselves having to work more collaboratively with AI-based systems, they will need the technological literacy that enables them to understand the vocabulary of computer science and engineering that enables them to communicate with machines. Failing that, we may find that clinicians will simply be messengers and technicians carrying out the instructions provided by algorithms.

It really does seem like we’re moving towards a society in which the successful use of technology is, at least to some extent, premised on your understanding of how it works. As educators, it is incumbent on us to 1) know how the technology works so that we can 2) help students use it effectively while at the same time avoid exploitation by for-profit companies.

See also: Aoun, J. (2017). Robot proof: Higher Education in the Age of Artificial Intelligence. MIT Press.