Posted to Diigo 04/12/2012

    • : It’s not just what you know. It’s what you know about what you kno
    • To put it in more straightforward terms, anytime a student learns, he or she has to bring in two kinds of prior knowledge: knowledge about the subject at hand (say, mathematics or history) and knowledge about how learning works
    • the guidance we offer on the act of learning itself—the “metacognitive” aspects of learning—is more hit-or-miss
    • Research has found that students vary widely in what they know about how to learn
    • low-achieving students show “substantial deficits” in their awareness of the cognitive and metacognitive strategies that lead to effective learning
    • Teaching students good learning strategies would ensure that they know how to acquire new knowledge, which leads to improved learning outcomes
    • Students can assess their own awareness by asking themselves which of the following learning strategies they regularly use (the response to each item is ideally “yes”):

      • I draw pictures or diagrams to help me understand this subject.
      • I make up questions that I try to answer about this subject.
      • When I am learning something new in this subject, I think back to what I already know about it.
      • I discuss what I am doing in this subject with others.
      • I practice things over and over until I know them well in this subject,
      • I think about my thinking, to check if I understand the ideas in this subject.
      • When I don’t understand something in this subject I go back over it again.
      • I make a note of things that I don’t understand very well in this subject, so that I can follow them up.
      • When I have finished an activity in this subject I look back to see how well I did.
      • I organize my time to manage my learning in this subject.
      • I make plans for how to do the activities in this subject.
  • students who used fewer of these strategies reported more difficulty coping with their schoolwork