Posted to Diigo 06/08/2010

    • Do not feel free to delete the work done by someone else. If you think something is out of place, or should be deleted, leave a note explaining your reasons
    • “contribute what isn’t there” One of the great things about working with other people who care about the same things as you do is that you get things that aren’t expected. Surprise is a very important part of learning. It is a great testimony to people’s work that their contribution made you think of something else and caused you to go off in another direction
    • “Do the grunt work” Any piece of work is going to be well served by cleaner sentences, more organized bullets, good spacing… that kind of thing
    • “Leave feedback” Create a new section, call it ‘feedback’ or something and just write out what it made you think
    • “wear the skin of the idea” try to follow it’s thinking before criticising it
    • “cheer” Just say “you know, i really enjoyed reading that”
    • What used to be the side show activity of only a few edubloggers now has the attention of researchers, academics, and conferences worldwide. Networked learning is popping up in all sorts of conference and book chapter requests – it’s largely the heart of what’s currently called web 2.0, and I fully expect it [networked learning] will outlive the temporary buzz and hype of all thing 2.0
    • numerous factors are at play here:
    • the tools we use to connect (blogs, wikis, podcast, Facebook, Twitter, Ning)
    • the theories of learning we adopt (connectivism, situated cognition, social constructivism, activity theory)
    • affordances of tools and theories
    • finally the systemic or structural changes required as a result of tools, theories, and affordances
    • We are well on our way in all areas, though systemic change is lagging. But I expect this is a temporary resistance as anomalies build under the existing system and weaknesses become increasingly apparent
    • All in all, it’s a rather delightful time to be in the knowledge, learning, education, technology field
    • Here is our current state:
    • We are actively networking
    • connection forming is natural. It doesn’t need coercion. We do it with language, images, video. We create, express, connect.
    • We are discussing the spaces of learning
    • an ecology, habitat, or studio is simply the space for fostering connections
    • Networks occur within something. They are influenced by the environment and context of an organization, school, or classroom
    • I’ve paid much attention to our role as teachers and instructors, but I’m not satisfied with how the conversation has progressed. I’m rather sick of “sage on stage” and “guide on the side” comparisons. The clear dichotomy chafes
    • the term “network administrator” to describe the role of teachers
    • learners get into trouble. They sometimes walk unproductive paths (though any path leads to at least some learning) that someone with experience can readily direct them around
    • A curator is an expert learner
    • Schooling is a highly perpetuated industry, making it exceedingly difficult to chang
    • The methods I used and the pedagogies I learned in university were based on information scarcity
    • One of the most interesting questions facing educators today is, “What are the pedagogies of information abundant learning environments?
    • many educators are shaping their information environment into a learning landscape, cultivating Personal Learning Networks